Bequest and Planned Giving

"I have included Bread for the World in my will. Perhaps you, like me, have done your will more than once. One of the things that comes up when making decisions about your will is how you want to be remembered.

"I want to be remembered as someone who made a difference in the lives of my family members, my students, and people who struggle with hunger and poverty. That’s why, after my children and grandchildren, Bread for the World is a part of my will." — Mary Murphy, Northampton, Massachusetts

Make a gift to Bread for the World. Photo: UN / Simone McCourtie

What will your legacy be?

We all want to be remembered for something. Like Mary, we want to be remembered for the difference we made in the lives of people we touched. We would like our legacy to be one of compassion, faith, and generosity. As a member of Bread for the World, you have already shown your kindness and compassion for hungry people. You have acted on God’s call to love our neighbors and all people in need.

As you consider the legacy you want to leave, we invite you to make Bread part of your legacy. Join others in our Legacy of Hope, and help sustain our work to end hunger.

No matter your age, there’s no better time than now to make provisions for faithful stewardship of the gifts God has given you. Estate planning protects and provides for your family. Including a bequest, annuity, or other gift in those estate plans creates hope for hungry people.

We would be happy to talk with you or send you more information about creative ways you can make a planned gift to further Bread’s impact in the lives of hungry people. For more information, please contact:

Jim Lund
Vice President of Development and Membership
(800) 822-7323, ext. 1091
jlund@bread.org

Art Simon is the founder of Bread for the World. Photo: Bread for the World

A Message from Art Simon, Founder and President Emeritus

Before I stepped aside as president of Bread for the World in 1991, David Beckmann, our new president, asked me to continue to serve with the board of directors and to help out in other ways.

As I thought about the legacy I wanted to leave, I decided to give part of my modest estate to Bread for the World.

I sent a letter to some other Bread for the World members and invited them to join me in taking this step. From those early efforts has grown what we call the Legacy of Hope, which now includes more than 400 individuals and families.

Each year, I have privilege of talking over the phone with most of those in our Legacy of Hope. Hearing what’s happening in their lives and how they are living out their faith always astounds and inspires me. God has truly created a “cloud of witnesses” to the One who is the Bread of Life and who calls us to be “Bread for the World.”

In recent years, the funds received from bequests and other planned gifts have made it possible to launch new initiatives, reach out to new audiences, and sustain core activities.

Just as important, though, those who participate in the Legacy of Hope inspire other Bread for the World members to follow their example — and find new ways to provide financial support for our work together to end hunger.

As you consider family’s needs and your own legacy, you may wish to include a gift for Bread for the World or Bread for the World Institute in your long-term financial planning. You may be inspired by the stories of others who have done so along with the brief descriptions of the options available to you. And you are welcome to request additional information — or indicate that you would like to talk with a member of our staff. — Art Simon

I want to be remembered as someone who made a difference in the lives of people who struggle with hunger and poverty.

Mary Murphy, Northampton, Massachusetts

Video

Ending Hunger

May 1, 2015

Leave a Legacy of Hope

Video - running time: 4:55

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

  • Feed the Future

    Feed the Future, launched in 2010, grew out of the U.S. response, led by President George W. Bush, to the 2007-2008 global food price crisis. Prices of basic foods doubled or tripled in some countries and pushed an additional 150 million people into hunger and malnutrition.

  • U.S. Hunger and Poverty State Fact Sheets

    These fact sheets provide a snapshot of hunger and poverty in the United States and in each state plus Washington, D.C. 

  • Hunger and Poverty in the African-American Community

    While hunger declined from 2017 for the general U.S. population, African Americans experienced a one percent increase, an increase of 153,000 African American households.

For Faith

  • Unity Declaration on Racism and Poverty

    A diverse body of Christian leaders calls on the churches and Congress to focus on the integral connection.

    Dear Members of Congress,

    As the president and Congress are preparing their plans for this year, almost 100 church leaders—from all the families of U.S. Christianity—are...

  • In Times Like These … A Pan-African Christian Devotional for Public Policy Engagement

    This devotional guide invites deepened relationship with and among Pan-Af­rican people and elected leaders in the mission to end hunger and poverty.

  • Sermon by David Beckmann at Duke University Chapel

    Remarks delivered October 1, 2017 at Duke University Chapel in Chapel Hill in North Carolina.

    Thank you for inviting me to preach here at Duke University Chapel. And I especially want to thank the Bread for the World members who have come this morning.

    Bruce Puckett urged...

For Advocacy

  • Grassroots Advocacy Toolkit

    A set of how-to sheets for carrying out advocacy and fact sheets on the current issues Bread for the World is working on.

    For new and current Bread grassroots hunger activists.

    Ideal as a starter toolkit for new Bread activists or as a set of updates for current activists.

    ...

  • U.S. Hunger and Poverty State Fact Sheets

    These fact sheets provide a snapshot of hunger and poverty in the United States and in each state plus Washington, D.C. 

  • Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2017

    Unnecessarily long prison sentences, combined with the lack of rehabilitative programs for people in prison, exacerbate hunger, poverty, and existing inequalities.

    Overly harsh mandatory minimum prison sentences have contributed to the rapid increase of our country’s prison population. The...

Field

Changing Climate, Changing Farmers

February 7, 2017

Insight

The Jobs Challenge

April 10, 2018

From the Blog