Biblical Reflection

The Apostle Paul reminds us that, because of Christ’s death and resurrection, we are “a new creation” (2 Corinthian 5:17). We see the world with new eyes and with hearts filled with God’s limitless love.

And so, remembering Joseph in Egypt, Jesus feeding the thousands, the early church in Acts, and Paul’s charge to the Corinthians, we are moved to do our part to end hunger by advocating for Congress to make funding decisions that begin to lay the foundation for a world without hunger.

Meeting People's Most Basic Needs

Lessons from the Bible also show that when groups of people come together, each person doing his or her part and sharing common resources, all can have enough to eat. In Genesis 41, Joseph interprets Pharaoh’s dream to mean that Egypt would see both abundance and famine in the coming years. Putting his faith in God, Joseph instructs Pharaoh to save grain from years of plenty to feed people in years of famine. Exercising good government, Joseph creates a system where everyone contributes in years of plenty so none go hungry in years of scarcity. Because of good management of shared resources, Egypt not only had enough to meet their needs, but also to feed their neighbors too. Today, God calls on us to exercise good governance and to use our nation’s resources so that all have enough to eat.

In the New Testament, common resources are also shared so that all are fed. Matthew 14:13-21 tells the story of Jesus and the feeding of the 5,000. Jesus gathers the resources available (just five loaves and two fish) and the disciples share them with the thousands of people who gathered so that “all ate and were filled” (Matthew 14:20). In the end, there is such an abundance that 12 baskets are full of leftovers.

Just as it did for the first readers of Matthew, the feeding of the 5,000 points us to God’s gracious abundance to us in the Lord’s Supper or Eucharist. As we are nourished by this spiritual feast, we are called to help feed everyone, even when resources seem scarce.

Doing Our Part

The early church, which gathered each week to share that Eucharistic meal, feeding those in need was a prominent activity. In Acts 2, people from many nations gathered together and received the Holy Spirit. The Spirit-inspired community pooled their resources so those who have need would not want for anything. That same Spirit inspires our communities to do our part to end hunger by gathering our resources to ensure that all have what they need.

The Apostle Paul reminds us that, because of Christ’s death and resurrection, we are “a new creation” (2 Corinthian 5:17). We see the world with new eyes and with hearts filled with God’s limitless love.

And so, remembering Joseph in Egypt, Jesus feeding the thousands, the early church in Acts, and Paul’s charge to the Corinthians, we are moved to do our part to end hunger by advocating for Congress to make funding decisions that begin to lay the foundation for a world without hunger.

Through the federal budget process, Congress can make funding decisions that put us on track to end hunger and poverty by 2030. The federal budget uses the common resource of the people’s taxes to supply the diversity of needs which includes those who are hungry and living in poverty. Federal budget proposals and resolutions can set forth a long-term vision of eliminating hunger and poverty.

These proposals include full employment, job creation, reframing our tax codes, safety-net programs like SNAP, WIC, global nutrition, and international development programs focused on poverty. The federal budget also sets the trend for states and other nations. By working to persuade Congress and the president to fund these measures, we are doing our part to end hunger and realizing God’s vision of a world where all people “will hunger no more” (Revelation 7:16).

"They will hunger no more."

Revelation 7:16

Have a question? Connect with your local organizer: 800/822-7323 or organizing@bread.org.

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

For Faith

  • Unity Declaration on Racism and Poverty

    A diverse body of Christian leaders calls on the churches and Congress to focus on the integral connection.

    Dear Members of Congress,

    As the president and Congress are preparing their plans for this year, almost 100 church leaders—from all the families of U.S. Christianity—are...

  • In Times Like These … A Pan-African Christian Devotional for Public Policy Engagement

    This devotional guide invites deepened relationship with and among Pan-Af­rican people and elected leaders in the mission to end hunger and poverty.

  • Sermon by David Beckmann at Duke University Chapel

    Remarks delivered October 1, 2017 at Duke University Chapel in Chapel Hill in North Carolina.

    Thank you for inviting me to preach here at Duke University Chapel. And I especially want to thank the Bread for the World members who have come this morning.

    Bruce Puckett urged...

For Advocacy

  • U.S. Hunger and Poverty State Fact Sheets

    These fact sheets provide a snapshot of hunger and poverty in the United States and in each state plus Washington, D.C. 

  • Fact Sheet: Hunger by the Numbers

    In 2017, 11.8 percent of households in the U.S.—40 million people—were food-insecure, meaning that they were unsure at some point during the year about how they would provide for their next meal.

  • Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2017

    Unnecessarily long prison sentences, combined with the lack of rehabilitative programs for people in prison, exacerbate hunger, poverty, and existing inequalities.

    Overly harsh mandatory minimum prison sentences have contributed to the rapid increase of our country’s prison population. The...

Field

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