Faith Action

As followers of Christ, we seek to express and embody God’s reconciling love at all times and in all places. Throughout the Scriptures, God speaks of our purpose to rebuild, restore and renew all that is broken (Isaiah 61). We work to end the brokenness of hunger and poverty in our communities, in our country, and around the world. We partner in God’s work to remove the barriers that impede the flourishing God intended for all people.

Scriptures speak to the role and responsibility of leaders in caring for poor people (Psalm 72; Jeremiah 22; Proverbs 31:8-9). Photo: Laura Pohl/Bread for the World

Our faith moves us

The themes below are important faith motivations for working to end hunger.

Loving our neighbor

Scriptures speak to the role and responsibility of leaders in caring for poor people (Psalm 72; Jeremiah 22; Proverbs 31:8-9).  In the New Testament, Jesus calls his follows to love their neighbors (Matthew 22:39-40) and warns that the nations will be held accountable and judged for the ways that they have treated the least among them (Matthew 25:31-46).

Christian discipleship

In the Gospels, Jesus was compassionate to all people, especially the widow, the orphan, the stranger, the hungry, the poor, and the infirmed — the most vulnerable in society (Isaiah 61:1-2; Matthew 11:2-6; Luke 4:18-21). Jesus loved all people — rich and poor — and actively cared for people in need. He urged his disciples to do the same (Matthew 25:31-46). We too are commissioned to do the same today.

Confession of our complicity to sin

Human sin has marred every aspect of creation. Sin is both individual and social, personal and structural. Because of greed and disobedience to God’s commandments, humanity experiences social and economic disparity that leads to hunger and poverty. Through the prophets, God held rulers accountable for the sin of the nation of Israel (Jeremiah 22:1-5). Poverty is a disastrous aspect of human sin.

Bread believes that local churches have the needed structures for teaching and training people to live out their faith in the world. Photo: UN

We gather in communities of faith

Many Christians belong to a church, a place where they worship, learn, and practice their faith. Because congregations are where many Christians gather regularly, and because congregations form disciples for work in the world, Bread launches its mobilizing of Christians for advocacy through communities of faith.

Bread partners with local congregations and the denominations or networks to which the churches belong to connect with people of faith. Local churches have structures for teaching and training people to live out their faith in the world. Bread works with people in churches to help carry out this important aspect of Christian faith: loving our neighbors, enabling people to eat, and reconciling the world.

As people of faith, it is our moral calling to be politically engaged. Photo: Joe Molieri/Bread for the World

Christians’ involvement in civic affairs

As people of faith, we heed our moral call to engage with our government. Practicing citizenship is our right under the U.S. Constitution. Hunger is a profoundly important issue that should be a top concern of our government. We are serving God when we raise issues of hunger and poverty with our government. It is our responsibility to engage in the processes that remind all elected officials to make relief from hunger and poverty a priority and to address their root causes. To convey this message, concerned people of faith can and should be involved in advocacy before the government.

"You shall love your neighbor as yourself."

Matthew 22:39

Most food assistance comes from the federal government. Infographic by Doug Puller / Bread for the World

How much can food banks and charities do?

Food banks and charities provide only one out of every 20 bags of groceries that feed people who are hungry. The federal government provides the rest. 

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

For Faith

For Advocacy

  • Grassroots Advocacy Toolkit

    A set of how-to sheets for carrying out advocacy and fact sheets on the current issues Bread for the World is working on.

    For new and current Bread grassroots hunger activists.

    Ideal as a starter toolkit for new Bread activists or as a set of updates for current activists.

    ...

  • Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2017

    Unnecessarily long prison sentences, combined with the lack of rehabilitative programs for people in prison, exacerbate hunger, poverty, and existing inequalities.

    Overly harsh mandatory minimum prison sentences have contributed to the rapid increase of our country’s prison population. The...

  • Health Care Is a Hunger Issue

    Learn more about the principles that Bread for the World supports regarding health reform.

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