Developing strategies to end hunger

Current Research Areas

 

Hunger in the United States is rooted in poverty. We need to create good jobs for everyone who can work; provide supports, such as affordable child care, to enable lower-wage workers to keep their jobs; and strengthen our education system so more people qualify for jobs in today's "knowledge economy."

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The current farm bill was signed into law on February 7, 2014. It includes $8.6 billion in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps). SNAP is designed to expand when needs are higher -- such as this year, as millions of families continue to struggle in the aftermath of the Great Recession -- and to shrink when fewer people fall below the income threshold to qualify. With one in six Americans currently participating in SNAP to help put food on the table, now is not the time to cut the program that is the nation's first line of defense against hunger. We also continue to be concerned about the impact of some U.S. agriculture policies on farmers in the developing world. Federal commodity payments that enable U.S. exports to sell for artificially low prices make it impossible for farmers whose governments cannot provide such support to compete. 

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The U.N. Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are an unprecedented effort to set and achieve measurable development goals. A new set of goals, which will go into effect when the MDGs expire in December 2015, should emphasize building on the progress made under the MDGs to end mass hunger and extreme poverty entirely by 2030.

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Growing awareness of the importance of good nutrition in the 1,000-day "window of opportunity" between pregnancy and a child's second birthday has brought stronger political leadership to preventing malnutrition during this period -- particularly from the countries in the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) movement (50 at last count) and their global supporters.

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Bread for the World Institute supports poverty-focused development assistance, which enables people in the developing world to get access to the tools they need to improve their lives. Development assistance focuses on clean water, immunizations, nutritious foods, farming supplies, and other prerequisites for creating a healthy, functioning community. 

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There are 11 million to 12 million unauthorized immigrants in the United States, mainly from Mexico and Central America. Developing immigration policies that meet the needs of the U.S. economy, workers, and sending countries will require looking for ways to improve the conditions that drive people to leave home in addition to focusing on U.S. labor market needs.

  

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There are far too many hungry people -- about one out of every eight people on the planet -- and malnutrition still kills millions of young children every year. But less than 50 years ago, the hunger rate was one in every three people. Reducing hunger so dramatically in just a few decades is an achievement we can build on. We have the knowledge and technology to end mass hunger by 2030. We just need the political will.  

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Some of the poorest farmers in the world are already struggling with the effects of climate change -- more severe droughts, more frequent floods, pests devouring crops in regions where they've never been seen before, and more. Climate change, combined with the need to double the production of food by 2050 to meet the needs of a projected 9 billion people, makes increasing global investments in sustainable agricultural productivity more urgent than ever.  

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