June 9, 2015

Bread for the World Applauds G-7’s Commitment to Lift 500 Million Out of Hunger,Urges Congress to Pass the Global Food Security Act

Bread for the World applauds the commitment of the world’s richest countries to lift 500 million people out of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, and urged Congress to demonstrate the United States’ pledge to this goal by passing the Global Food Security Act.

“We welcome the G-7’s decision to continue its focus on food security by committing to lift 500 million people in developing countries out of hunger and malnutrition by 2030,” said Asma Lateef, director of the Bread for the World Institute. “It builds on previous G-7 commitments on hunger and nutrition, specifically the L’Aquila Food Security Initiative, and ensures these actions continue to empower women, smallholder and family farmers.”

The G-7 leaders made this commitment at the end of their annual summit in Schloss Elmau, Krun, Germany, June 7-8. The G-7 is composed of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In advance of the summit, German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on all G-7 countries to end hunger and absolute poverty by 2030.

One of the ways the United States can support this commitment is through the passage of the Global Food Security Act. It authorizes and improves the government’s Feed the Future program. The program, which Bread for the World has supported, works hand-in-hand with partner countries to develop their agriculture sectors and break the cycles of hunger, poverty, and malnutrition.

“The United States’ leadership has been important in focusing global attention on hunger and malnutrition. Congress should demonstrate similar leadership by passing the Global Food Security Act,” said Eric Mitchell, director of government relations at Bread for the World. “This legislation has strong bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate, and we urge congressional leaders to move this legislation forward and support its passage.”

Last month, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization announced that world hunger had dropped by 167 million in the previous decade, to 795 million. This was due in part to programs like Feed the Future, which are investing in small farmers in developing countries, increasing their productivity and their incomes.

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