April 4, 2014

Bread for the World Analysis Seeks to Recognize Dr. King’s Legacy

Washington, D.C. – Forty-six years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., hunger and poverty continues to disproportionately affect the African-American community. A recent analysis by Bread for the World takes a look at how employment issues, such as the stagnant minimum wage, impact the African-American community.

“The anniversary of Dr. King’s death reminds us that we still have a long way to go in ensuring freedom from hunger and poverty for African-Americans,” said Bishop Don DiXon Williams, associate for African American Church Relations at Bread for the World. “I urge everyone to advocate against efforts by members of Congress to cut programs vital to struggling African-American families, and hungry and poor people at large.”

Bread’s analysis, “Hunger by the Numbers in the African-American Community: Employment, Wages, and Fairness,” addresses hunger and poverty in the African-American community by taking a closer look at challenges Dr. King was facing at the time of his death.  

In the late 1960s, Dr. King was actively involved in planning the Poor People’s Campaign for economic opportunity and equality. Amid this ongoing fight for social justice, he went to Memphis, Tenn., to support a movement by sanitation workers to protest a history of neglect and abuse. He believed the fight in Memphis would expose the need for economic equality and social justice, which he hoped to highlight on a national scale with the Poor People’s Campaign.

The day before the sanitation workers’ scheduled march, Dr. King was assassinated on the balcony of his room at the Lorraine Hotel in Memphis.

“Dr. King gave his life fighting for economic opportunity—a fight that is still important today, as too many African-Americans continue to suffer from hunger and poverty,” Williams added. “Ending hunger in America is possible, but in order to effectively address this issue we must honor Dr. King’s legacy by achieving economic opportunity and equality.”

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

  • Election Resources

    One of the best times to raise the issues of hunger and poverty is during election campaigns. Engage candidates in your state/district on hunger and poverty using our elections resources.
  • U.S. Hunger and Poverty State Fact Sheets

    These fact sheets provide a snapshot of hunger and poverty in the United States and in each state plus Washington, D.C. 

  • Conflict and Fragility Are Hunger Issues

    Conflict is a main driver of the recent increase in hunger around the world and of forced migration. Hunger also contributes to conflict.

For Faith

  • The Bible on Health as a Hunger Issue

    “As you therefore have received Christ Jesus the Lord, continue to live your lives in him, rooted and built up in him and established in faith.” These words from Colossians 2:6 remind us of the faith that is active in love for our neighbors.

    The Bible on...

  • Unity Declaration on Racism and Poverty

    A diverse body of Christian leaders calls on the churches and Congress to focus on the integral connection.

    Dear Members of Congress,

    As the president and Congress are preparing their plans for this year, almost 100 church leaders—from all the families of U.S. Christianity—are...

  • In Times Like These … A Pan-African Christian Devotional for Public Policy Engagement

    This devotional guide invites deepened relationship with and among Pan-Af­rican people and elected leaders in the mission to end hunger and poverty.

For Advocacy

Faith

African at Heart

November 22, 2019

Insight

From the Blog