Washington Update: Week of October 30

October 31, 2017
Washington Update

Budget & Appropriations (2017 Offering of Letters)

  • Last week, the House narrowly passed the Senate’s budget resolution. The vote was 216-212. The 2018 budget now paves the way for tax reform that will negatively impact low-income households.
  • Both the House and the Senate are now working on the appropriations process. We will continue to monitor the spending bills as they become public.

Taxes

  • On Wednesday, Nov. 1, the House Ways and Means Committee will release its long-awaited tax-overhaul proposal. The House must guide the proposal through committee and the full House by Thanksgiving in order to deliver a tax reform bill to President Trump by the end of 2017.
  • The legislation is expected to cut the corporate tax rate to 20 percent from 35 percent and provide across-the-board rate cuts for individuals -- except, perhaps, for those earners at the very top.
  • We are very concerned about the legislation including any efforts to require earned income tax credit (EITC) filers to submit mandatory income verification before receiving the credit. This would result in extremely long delays in issuing EITC refunds to low-income individuals and families. Any delay of the credit will result in increased poverty.
  • In addition, we have heard that the proposed legislation might require a Social Security Number for those tax filers claiming the child tax credit (CTC). Under existing law, immigrants who file their taxes with an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number are eligible to claim the CTC on behalf of qualifying children. Current proposals (in stand-alone legislation, the president's budget proposal, and the House-passed budget resolution) include an elimination of the CTC for mixed-status and immigrant families.
  • Any change in eligibility for child tax credits will harm children, specifically 5.1 million children with at least one undocumented parent in the home.

Act Now!

Bread for the World is partnering with the Interfaith Immigration Coalition for the #Faith4Dream week! #Faith4Dream, Oct. 29 to Nov. 4, is a dedicated week of faith-based advocacy to ensure Congress passes legislation that provides “Dreamers” with a pathway to citizenship.

Tell your representative and senators to support and pass the Dream Act of 2017 (S.1615/H.R. 3440). Advocating for the Dream Act of 2017 is putting the faithful call to love our neighbors into action.

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

For Faith

  • Unity Declaration on Racism and Poverty

    A diverse body of Christian leaders calls on the churches and Congress to focus on the integral connection.

    Dear Members of Congress,

    As the president and Congress are preparing their plans for this year, almost 100 church leaders—from all the families of U.S. Christianity—are...

  • In Times Like These … A Pan-African Christian Devotional for Public Policy Engagement

    This devotional guide invites deepened relationship with and among Pan-Af­rican people and elected leaders in the mission to end hunger and poverty.

  • Sermon by David Beckmann at Duke University Chapel

    Remarks delivered October 1, 2017 at Duke University Chapel in Chapel Hill in North Carolina.

    Thank you for inviting me to preach here at Duke University Chapel. And I especially want to thank the Bread for the World members who have come this morning.

    Bruce Puckett urged...

For Advocacy

  • Grassroots Advocacy Toolkit

    A set of how-to sheets for carrying out advocacy and fact sheets on the current issues Bread for the World is working on.

    For new and current Bread grassroots hunger activists.

    Ideal as a starter toolkit for new Bread activists or as a set of updates for current activists.

    ...

  • U.S. Hunger and Poverty State Fact Sheets

    These fact sheets provide a snapshot of hunger and poverty in the United States and in each state plus Washington, D.C. 

  • Fact Sheet: Hunger by the Numbers

    In 2017, 11.8 percent of households in the U.S.—40 million people—were food-insecure, meaning that they were unsure at some point during the year about how they would provide for their next meal.

Field

Changing Climate, Changing Farmers

February 7, 2017

Insight

April 10, 2018

The Jobs Challenge

From the Blog