Activists in Action

February 13, 2019

Ms. Brianna Tenè Harris is a first-generation college student who openly talks about her desire to increase nutritional food access to low income communities. A native of Queens, New York, Tenè will be graduating from Spelman College this May with a dual degree in Spanish and Economics. 

In her first year as a Bread advocate, Tenè has organized two Bread for the World events. Last year, Tenè co-organized a community meeting with Bread for the World. This meeting brought together students and community groups to discuss root cause issues and solutions to hunger concerns impacting Georgian residents. Shortly thereafter, Brianne bought together a group of Spelman students to participate and discuss Bread for the World Racial Wealth Gap Simulation.

“Bread for the World is a great organization. I’m looking forward to partnering with Bread for one more event in the Spring before I walk across the stage to start the next chapter of my life.” 

In addition to her work with Bread, Tenè had the opportunity to participate in the pilot cohort of the Zero Hunger Internship Program, a new initiative developed by the Congressional Hunger Center and the Bonner Foundation, this past summer. The program placed Tenè with Feeding America, where she was fully immersed in the politics of the Farm Bill and its impact on food assistance programs including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), The Emergency Food Assistance Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program. Tenè was so amazed at how much power policy has on food access, that she decided to continue this work into her fall semester at Spelman College.

Tenè is now actively working with the student groups to make sure her efforts do not fade once she graduates.

 

 

Tools
from our Resource Library

For Education

  • Election Resources

    One of the best times to raise the issues of hunger and poverty is during election campaigns. Engage candidates in your state/district on hunger and poverty using our elections resources.
  • Racially Equitable Responses to Hunger During COVID-19 and Beyond

    By Marlysa D. Gamblin and Kathleen King

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines food insecurity as when a person or household does not have regular, reliable access to the foods needed for good health. Black, Indigenous, and Other People of Color (BIPOC) have historically had higher...

  • Fact Sheet: COVID-19 Global Pandemic, Better Nutrition Protects Lives

    With the coronavirus now spreading in low-resource contexts and new waves of infection expected in the coming year, better nutrition for vulnerable people is more important than ever.

For Faith

  • Finding Hope, Ending Hunger on Both Sides of the Border: A Bilingual Latino Devotional

    Devotional writers challenge us to feel the Spirit of God within us and to hear God’s urgent call to demand justice so all can put food on the table.
  • The Bible on Health as a Hunger Issue

    “As you therefore have received Christ Jesus the Lord, continue to live your lives in him, rooted and built up in him and established in faith.” These words from Colossians 2:6 remind us of the faith that is active in love for our neighbors.

    The Bible on...

  • Unity Declaration on Racism and Poverty

    A diverse body of Christian leaders calls on the churches and Congress to focus on the integral connection.

    Dear Members of Congress,

    As the president and Congress are preparing their plans for this year, almost 100 church leaders—from all the families of U.S. Christianity—are...

For Advocacy

Faith

African at Heart

November 22, 2019

Insight

From the Blog