TOOLKITS

Tools for Activists

Welcome to the Tools for Activists. We update this page regularly with the latest information, tools, and resources, so make sure to visit weekly.

Act Now

Global Food Security Act

Call (800-826-3688) or email your members of Congress and urge them to co-sponsor the reauthorization of the Global Food Security Act, which provides the U.S. government with a comprehensive strategy to end hunger and malnutrition and build stronger agricultural infrastructures.

The Global Food Security Act has been at work through a program called Feed the Future. Working with local partners, Feed the Future has helped prevent 3.4 million children from stunting and malnutrition, brought 5.2 million families out of hunger, and lifted 23.4 million people out of poverty globally.

Write to Congress

For more information on this issue:

The 2022 Offering of Letters to Congress

Visit Website

Global Malnutrition Prevention and Treatment Act of 2021

Download

Why global nutrition programs need $300 million

Download

More Resources: Activist Toolkit

The Activist Toolkit is intended for new and current Bread grassroots hunger activists. It provides a set of how-to sheets for carrying out advocacy and fact sheets on the current issues Bread for the World is working on.
It’s ideal as a starter toolkit for new Bread activists or as a set of updates for current activists. Form your own toolkit by printing out some or all of the sheets in the kit.

Mago Reyes is an extraordinary woman with an extraordinary story.

Brought to America at 15 by her then husband, Reyes spent her teens working two jobs. While most young girls her age were fretting over school exams, Reyes went to work early every morning, bending over a row of fruit or vegetables in an Oregon field. Her second shift, from 2 p.m. to midnight, was at a lunch cart.

Fast-forward eighteen years, three children, domestic violence, and a divorce later; I meet her in another Oregon field. But this time the plants belong to her.

Read Mago’s Full Story

While most young girls her age were fretting over school exams, Reyes’ went to work early every morning, bending over a row of fruit or vegetable in an Oregon field.